Top 5 National Parks in Rajasthan

Top 5 National Parks in Rajasthan

Rajasthan – the incredible state of India has always been on the topmost list amongst the wanderlust traveler coming to India, be it the eco tourism, heritage tourism, spiritual tourism or wildlife tourism. The colorful state of India enjoys the status of largest state of country and it is notably prosperous in terms of wildlife heritage. Apart from all these the state is an abode of many endangered species which includes tiger and leopards. Best of all, best being home to some of the renowned wildlife sanctuaries and national parks; the magical land of Rajputs warrior’s offers ultimate wildlife destinations for tourists in Rajasthan. Here is a list of some of the popular wildlife spot of the state.

Ranthambore National Park
Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore National Park – Sawai Madhopur Rajasthan

Ranthambore is counted among the most visited forest reserves in India for spotting tigers. It was established in the year 1955 as the Sawai Madhopur Game Sanctuary and became a part of the Project Tiger in 1973. On November 1, 1980, Ranthambore was officially declared as National Park that spans 392 km currently. It is famous for a thriving population of Bengal Tigers who could be easily spotted in the daytime as well. Besides the big cat, you can also spot chital, mugger crocodile, rhesus macaque, gray langur, sloth bear, striped hyena, sambar, wild boar, nilgai, and Indian leopard.

Sariska Tiger Reserve
Sariska Tiger Reserve

Sariska Tiger Reserve – Alwar Rajasthan

Located in Alwar district, Sariska spans over 866 km, it is a part of the Kathiawar-Gir dry deciduous forests’ ecoregion and the Aravalli Range as well. Other than tigers, this place is also known for its mineral resources like copper. Once upon a time, it was the hunting preserve for the royalty of Alwar State, after independence, it slowly emerged to become a wildlife reserve in 1955. In the year 1978, it became a part of Project Tiger and in 1990, it officially became a national park. More than a decade before, there was a dearth of tigers in this reserve and poaching was ascribed the major reason this.

Kumbhalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary
Kumbhalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary

Kumbhalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary – Rajsamand Rajasthan

Located in the Rajsamand District, Kumbhalgarh wildlife sanctuary is a part of Kathiawar-Gir dry deciduous forests ecoregion and extends across the Aravalli Range as well. It is named after the fort of Kumbhalgarh which also becomes a big attraction for the tourists. Like many other forest reserves in Rajasthan, this one is also home to a large number of birds along with mammals. You can spot Indian hare, chinkara, chausingha, nilgai, sambhar, jungle cat, golden jackal, striped hyena, sloth bear, Indian leopard, and Indian wolf. When it comes to treating bird watchers, this sanctuary does its part with white-breasted kingfisher, dove, bulbul, grey pigeon, golden oriole, parakeet, red spurfowl, peacocks, and grey junglefowl as well.

Jawai Leopard Conservation
Jawai Leopard Conservation

Jawai Leopard Conservation – Jawai Bandh Pali Rajasthan

As we talked about the hidden gems which are quickly emerging to be the best tourist spots in the state, here’s one which promises you an enthralling tour no matter which month you visit in. Jawai is located near the Sumerpur town of Pali District and it offers a perfect ecosystem that you can enjoy in any season. It has a booming population of leopards, crocodiles, birds, and various other animals. The leopard safari remains the biggest attraction for the visitors as the big cats can be spotted very easily at this place. What makes Jawai a better destination for seeing leopards is hilly terrain and lack of dense forests.

Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur
Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur

Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur

Also known as Keoladeo Ghana National Park or Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary, this place is a major attraction for the ornithologists around the world. It is home to 366 species of birds and also a World Heritage Site. Another notable fact about this park is that it is a man-made and man-managed wetland that officially became a protected sanctuary in 1971. Besides the birds, it is home to 7 species of turtles and amphibians, 5 species of lizards, 13 species of snakes along with 379 species of flowering plants. The founder of World Wildlife Fund, Peter Scott considered Keoladeo as one of the best destinations for bird-watchers in the world.

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